By Dana Carillo / Kern Sol News

“Is it good for us?” This is a question Ivan Isidoro asked himself while thinking back on all the reasons he started his microgreens and edible flowers business. 

Isidoro owns and founded Evolution Greens, a small business that sells its products at the local farmers’ market. He has been growing and maintaining the business’s progress for five years. 

Isidoro’s business intends to bring goodness to people’s lives like he did for himself. Since the age of fifteen — when he came to the United States — he worked laborious jobs in the fields, helping to pick produce or in the oil fields. The ailments Isidoro acquired from work pushed him to find ways to heal naturally. 

“Most of my foods are whole foods — natural. Minimize the processed because, in a healthier lifestyle, you can’t be eating a lot of sugar. We already have the data that this is not good for us,” Isidoro continued. “I try to absorb things that are going to help our lifestyles, to feel better and be happy naturally.”

Isidoro’s wife and family supported him and his passions financially and emotionally. Because of this, he has been able to build the greenhouse in their backyard, which is home to the microgreens and several other projects. There is big news for individuals interested in Isidoro’s projects, like his microgreens business: his newest patent is pending. 

According to the National Bureau of Economic Research, immigrants make up over a quarter of all patents in the US. They also contribute as collaborators to over thirteen percent of all patents filed by native-born investors. Patents are granted to entrepreneurs and inventors who have original ideas. 

It was important for Isidoro to start his own business after realizing that co-workers in the oil fields were getting hurt like himself. Although the management at these work sites offers tools to help lower the risk of injury, some individuals do not use the aid. Isidoro further explained that doctors tried to prescribe him painkillers when he was hurt on the job. He turned down the pills and left the job to show the new and old generations how to live a more fulfilled life.

“I call [my business] Evolution because we evolve. We can choose our lifestyle. This was a vision, it was just in my mind… that’s magic right there,” Isidoro stated. 

The big takeaway for young entrepreneurs like Isidoro is to believe in the magic of making your vision come to life. One of Isidoro’s passions is to show his community how to survive off of their own land and resources and then how to thrive. He considers growing sprouts from beans you find at the market an example of basic skills everyone should practice to help benefit their money savings and vegetable intake. 

“It’s better if we start growing our own. Together we have kind of an exchange of goods,” Isidoro explained. 

It’s a blessing for Isidoro to know he has access to seeds, harvested food, and clean water. He envisions a future where neighborhoods exchange produce and goods like fresh eggs, fruits, milk, honey, and greens. The advice Isidoro wanted to give his community was to strive for happiness using tools like healthy eating, connecting with loved ones, exercising, and plenty of fresh air. 

“If we can promote this lifestyle and show that it’s even better for us long term, then we can change the new generations and we need to,” Isidoro said.